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Waidner-Spahr Library

Waidner-Spahr News and Events: Home

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The library hosts events, exhibits, and art displays throughout the year. These enhance the cultural and academic life of the Dickinson community by illuminating resources and research activity, and promoting scholarship and creative endeavors on campus. Student photography, treasures from the archives, sculptures and artwork: you can find it all here, so don't forget to take a break from your studying to check out the latest.

Monthly Overview

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April 2019

CAMPUS ENERGY CHALLENGE: March 25 - April 15

BUILDING COMMUNITY: Autism Awareness & Sexual Assault Awareness

Library Events

FACULTEA: SHERRY HARPER-McCOMBS "IN FRONT OF THE SHADOW: MODERN TAKES ON A TRADITIONAL PERFORMING ART FORM" 

Wednesday, April 3,  4:30pm,  Main Level - Stafford Reading Area (Fishbowl)‚Äč

Exhibits & Book Displays

RESEARCH & WRITING BOOK DISPLAY

Dickinson Reads Area - Main Level

DICKINSON YEARBOOKS: AN HISTORICAL OVERVIEW EXHIBIT

Friends of the Library Area - Lower Level

THE NUCLEAR CRISIS OF 1979: DICKINSON COLLEGE & THREE MILE ISLAND EXHIBIT

Archives Hallway - Lower Level

THE POTATO CHIP FACTORY: A MYSTERIOUS BUILDING ON DICKINSON'S CAMPUS EXHIBIT

Archives Hallway - Lower Level

FORTUNE TELLING: BOOKS & ARTIFACTS FROM SPECIAL COLLECTIONS

Upper Level

NATIONAL POETRY MONTH BOOK DISPLAY

Dickinson Reads Area - Main Level

THIS SEMESTER ON CAMPUS BOOK DISPLAY

Reference Area - Main Level

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Featured Faculty Publication

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"Does Sharing Backfire? A Decomposition of Household and Urban Economies in CO2 Emissions"

Anthony Underwood
 anthony underwood

Assistant Professor of Economics

 

Both multi-person households and dense urban areas reduce per capita carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by enabling people to share carbon-intensive goods within and between households. In this paper, Professor Underwood and co-author estimate these household and urban economies in CO2 emissions using detailed household expenditure data for the United States. They then decompose these economies into their primary sources and investigate any potential rebound effects, or diseconomies. The results show that the bulk of household and urban economies come from reductions in emissions from residential energy use and private vehicle transportation. They also find some evidence of rebound effects, with both residential density and multi-person households increasing expenditures on air travel and restaurant meals in particular. These effects are small in comparison to the size of total net economies, suggesting that fears of large rebound effects or backfire effects may be overstated. These results further suggest that policies targeted at the provision of social and technological infrastructure, such as public transportation, mixed-use zoning, and public internet may be most effective in reducing the rural-urban divide in private vehicle emissions.

Recommended Citation:

Underwood, Anthony, and Anders Fremstad. "Does Sharing Backfire? A Decomposition of Household and Urban Economies in CO2 Emissions." Energy Policy 123 (2018): 404-413.